Java Open Source Projects Directory

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Testing Tools

jtr-java-test-runner

JTR (Java Test Runner) is a framework meant for fastening the building of both complex and simple test enviroments. It is based on concepts such as Inversion of Control, and is ready for EJB and JMS testing. The JTR 2.0 framework will give you the chance to code only the testing logic. All the boring middleware-related tasks (connecting to ConnectionFactories, opening connections, sharing connections, opening sessions, handleing exceptions, retrieving administered objects) are carried out by the JTR 2.0 runtime on your behalf according to what you have stated in the jtr.xml configuration file. Thanks to IoC (Inversion Of Control), the JTR 2.0 runtime is able to inject all these resources into your IRunner concrete implementations. This entails that you are not required to actively retrieve the resources you need: you declaratively tell the JTR 2.0 framework you are going to need them at runtime, and Inversion Of Control will do the work. The thing same happens with EJBs: all the low-level details are always handled by the JTR framework to let you work only on the pure logic of your tests.

 

salome-tmf

Salome-TMF is a test management framework. Salome-TMF offers features for creating and executing tests. Salome-TMF uses the concept of tests defined in the norm ISO9646. Tests can be manual or automatic, tests are organized in campaigns and are executed with different datasets in different environments. For making test execution fully automatic, Salome-TMF has integrated a script language based on Java, as one of several plugins which extend Salome-TMF functionalities.

 

mockejb

Lightweight framework allowing to run EJBs without the application server support for testing purposes.

 

swtbot

SWTBot is an open-source Java based functional testing tool for testing SWT and Eclipse based applications. SWTBot provides APIs that are simple to read and write. The APIs also hide the complexities involved with SWT and Eclipse. This makes it suitable for functional testing by everyone. SWTBot also provides its own set of assertions that are useful for SWT. You can also use your own assertion framework with SWTBot. SWTBot has a driver and recorder to playback and record tests and integrates with Eclipse, and also provides for ant tasks so that you can run your builds from within CruiseControl or any other CI tool that you use. SWTBot can run on all platforms that SWT runs on. Very few other testing tools provide such a wide variety of platforms.

 

tagunit

In the same way that JUnit allows us to write unit tests for Java classes, TagUnit allows us to unit test JSP custom tags, inside the container. In essence, TagUnit is a tag library for testing custom tags within JSP pages.

 

t2

T2 is a random testing tool. As one, it is fully automatic, but one must keep in mind that the code coverage of random testing is in general very limited. It should be used as a complement to other testing methods. T2 checks for internal errors, run time exceptions, method specifications, and class invariant. T2 does not check individual methods in isolation; instead T2 generates random executions where methods may interfere with each other, and thus it may discover more subtle errors. Violating executions can be saved for re-test (regression). No special specification language is needed. Specifications are written in plain Java. The current state is prototype.

 

abbot

The Abbot framework is a Java library for GUI unit testing and functional testing. It provides methods to reproduce user actions and examine the state of GUI components. The framework may be invoked directly from Java code or accessed without programming through the use of scripts.

 

testng

TestNG is a testing framework inspired from JUnit and NUnit but introducing some new functionalities that make it more powerful and easier to use, such as: - JSR 175 Annotations (JDK 1.4 is also supported with JavaDoc annotations). - Flexible test configuration. - Default JDK functions for runtime and logging (no dependencies). - Powerful execution model (no more TestSuite). - Supports dependent methods.

 


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